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Fracture-behavior of CAD/CAM ceramic crowns before and after cyclic fatigue aging

Sufyan Garoushi/Eija Säilynoja/Pekka K. Vallittu/Lippo Lassila


DOI: 10.11607/ijp.7207

Purpose: To evaluate the fracture behavior of monolithic crowns made of lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent; and Initial LiSi Block, GC) and zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (Celtra Duo, Dentsply Sirona; and Suprinity, VITA) materials before and after cyclic fatigue aging. Materials and Methods: Four groups (n = 22 per group) of CAD/CAM–fabricated maxillary incisor crowns were produced. All crowns were luted on metal dies with an adhesive dual-curing resin cement (G-CEM LinkForce [GC]). Half of the crowns in each group (n = 11) were statically loaded to fracture without aging. The remaining half were subjected to cyclic fatigue aging for 120,000 cycles (Fmax = 220 N) and then loaded statically to fracture. Fracture mode was then visually examined. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of the CAD/CAM ceramic materials. The data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) test (α = .05). Results: Before cyclic aging, there was no statistically significant difference in load-bearing capacity among the four groups (P = .371). After cyclic aging, the load-bearing capacity significantly decreased for all groups (P = .000). While the e.max CAD blocks had significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1,061 ± 94 N) than both monolithic ceramic crowns (P < .05), no significant difference was obtained compared to the Initial LiSi Block group (920 ± 140 N) (Tukey HSD P = .061). Conclusion: The mechanical performance of monolithic ceramic crowns fabricated from lithium disilicate was better than zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate after cyclic fatigue aging.


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